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Vitamin B3 Niacin (Niaspan) beats Zetia as Heart Medication

11. October 2010

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Vitamin B3 Niacin (Niaspan) beats Zetia as Heart Medication

I know this information is already about a year out of date but I thought it might be worth republishing (as I just ran into this article and study this last weekend.) At the 2009 meeting of the American Heart Association, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that niacin (vitamin B3) treatments worked better than the Merck prescription drug Zetia at reducing the size of arterial blockages in the neck.

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Obesity Rates in America Continue to Rise, Adenovirus May Play Role

21. September 2010

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Obesity Rates in America Continue to Rise, Adenovirus May Play Role

The latest examination of obesity rates by the CDC comes to some sobering conclusions about the state of public health in America. Their findings show a block of states, mostly concentrated in the South, now have obesity rates over 30%. Back in 1990, no states were over 20%, making the run-up in the last 20 years remarkable.

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Neurophotonics Coming to a Human Being Near You

20. September 2010

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Neurophotonics Coming to a Human Being Near You

Researchers at SMU are working with DARPA (the US hyper-advanced military research group that initially developed the internet) to create an artificial fiber optic signaling system that will directly interface with your body's central nervous system. This technology, called neurophotonics, would allow bidirectional communication to and from the brain, giving amputees with prosthetic arms and legs the ability to feel heat, cold and pain in those artificial extremities.

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Winds of Change: Antibiotics in Livestock

16. September 2010

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Winds of Change: Antibiotics in Livestock

The New York Times has a really good piece on the coming rules regarding the amount of antibiotics that can be given to confinement livestock. Now, after decades of debate, the Food and Drug Administration appears poised to issue its strongest guidelines on animal antibiotics yet, intended to reduce what it calls a clear risk [...]

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Understanding Our Bodies: Insulin

13. May 2010

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Understanding Our Bodies: Insulin

Insulin is one of the most important hormones in the human body, and yet most people don't really understand why our bodies make it or how what we eat affects the levels of insulin we produce. More so than any other hormone, our diet is key in regulating insulin levels, and thus a number of biological processes. As you'll soon see, everyone should think about how what they eat impacts their body's insulin release to be at their happiest and healthiest.

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When Cutting Calories Doesn’t Cut It

28. April 2010

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When Cutting Calories Doesn’t Cut It

New research out of the Oregon Health and Science University may explain the discrepancy between the theory and reality of dieting. They found that, at least in some of our closest relatives, cutting calories isn't enough to lose weight because the body compensates for the reduced intake by lowering activity levels. Image credit: iamchenelle, flickr

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Looking Deeper: Can Exercising 10 Minutes A Day Be Better Than 10 Hours?

2. April 2010

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Looking Deeper: Can Exercising 10 Minutes A Day Be Better Than 10 Hours?

A recent paper in The Journal of Physiology titled, "A practical model of low-volume high-intensity interval training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle: potential mechanisms." has caused quite a stir. It centers around a recent fashion in workouts called High-Intensity Interval Training, or HIT. HIT is a method of exercise which involves working as hard as you can for brief intervals followed by brief rest intervals. The idea is that by doing higher intensity workouts for shorter time intervals, you can work out "less" but get the same, or even more, benefit - but is that true?

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Book Review: The Fluoride Deception by Christopher Bryson

30. March 2010

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Book Review: The Fluoride Deception by Christopher Bryson

Few public health issues in American history have riled people quite like fluoride. Its story is replete with famous figures in American history, dramatic tales from the Manhattan Project, corporate cover-ups, redacted research, shattered careers of those that spoke against it's use and the tragedy at Donora in 1948. The tide that binds all these accounts together is a fascinating book called, “The Fluoride Deception” by Christopher Bryson. His work paints a picture with enough intrigue to be nominated for an Oscar but remains deftly aware of itself long enough to stay away from hyperbole – most of the time at least.

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Understanding Our Bodies – Fiber!

24. March 2010

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Understanding Our Bodies – Fiber!

Most of us already know that we should be eating fiber - according to the Institute of Medicine, adults should be eating 20-35 grams of it per day. But why? What's so important about fiber anyway? What does it do for us physiologically? And does it matter what kind of fiber we eat? (Image Credit: Sami Taipale, flickr)

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Is Childhood Obesity the Parent’s Fault?

14. January 2010

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Is Childhood Obesity the Parent’s Fault?

Childhood obesity is becoming a hot topic in health circles, even to the point of being called an epidemic. Experts estimate that 20% of children between the ages of 6 and 17 are overweight, predisposing them to terrible diseases like diabetes and heart disease. Why have the world's children ballooned over the past hundred years? (photo by photomequickbooth from flickr).

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